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here are several stills extracted from Wallander (2008, season 1, episode 1).

the series was shot in  Skåne  region on the South of Sweden, using RED cameras.

the cinematography is truly extraordinary. each landscape scene – a treasure (the same goes for interior scenes).  

sadly, I couldn’t find any promo pictures or any pictures at all, except for innumerable reblogs of uncountable numbers of Magnus’ close-ups (thanks to Hiddleston fangirls)

so I decided to make some screenshots myself (which, I obviously had no right to do, since I do not own the production) and to share them.

nevertheless enjoy

Wallander. first few seconds

Wallander. first few seconds


ABSTRARCH by Federico Babina
what can I say. I love architecture 

ABSTRARCH by Federico Babina

what can I say. I love architecture 

happy new year

I’m dressed in black, dark green and leather and “I’m burdened with glorious purpose”… all I need now is a helmet with horns or an army (both would be great).

have fun and happy new year!! love! inspire! be inspired! don’t be afraid of anything/anyone/yourself!!

renaissance-art:

Michelangelo c. 1501-1504
David
detail


David in the details…

renaissance-art:

Michelangelo c. 1501-1504

David

detail

David in the details…

(via spiritualize)

space
6. Sufficient freedom from external pressure to develop or explore one’s needs, interests, and individuality
the free dictionary. plenty of food for thought. surprised
Tim Davis, Two Chests from Office / Hospital 
Office / Hospital
I began my career as an artist with a career as an editor. Working at a small, venerable, avant-garde publishing firm, I spent four years sitting in an art-deco office building in Manhattan, reading poetry all day. I had an ideal life; but one I was unsuited for. Once, during a weekly editorial meeting, I noticed the way a fluorescent light fixture reflected the street scene nineteen floors below. It was a moment of liberation. Bored and constrained by the strictures of a nine-to-five life, this little camera lucida on the ceiling radiated freedom. I returned to the office that weekend, pointed my own camera up, and photographed the light fixture. For a year I would go to work at off hours, on weekends and holidays, scouring the small set of seven offices for signs of redemption and clarity. Photography became more than a tool for understanding the world, it was a method of generating meaning. It was a way to survive.

Tim DavisTwo Chests from Office / Hospital 

Office / Hospital

I began my career as an artist with a career as an editor. Working at a small, venerable, avant-garde publishing firm, I spent four years sitting in an art-deco office building in Manhattan, reading poetry all day. I had an ideal life; but one I was unsuited for. Once, during a weekly editorial meeting, I noticed the way a fluorescent light fixture reflected the street scene nineteen floors below. It was a moment of liberation. Bored and constrained by the strictures of a nine-to-five life, this little camera lucida on the ceiling radiated freedom. I returned to the office that weekend, pointed my own camera up, and photographed the light fixture. For a year I would go to work at off hours, on weekends and holidays, scouring the small set of seven offices for signs of redemption and clarity. Photography became more than a tool for understanding the world, it was a method of generating meaning. It was a way to survive.

the camera is an amnesiac constantly, comically and tragically, looking at a new world, and its amnesia is contagious.
MAD cover 
September 1963

MAD cover 

September 1963

Far and away the best prize that life has to offer is the chance to work hard at work worth doing
– Theodore Roosevelt 
I love the cover! and I want this book
The definitive monograph on an artist who pioneered the use of the body in art.

I love the cover! and I want this book

The definitive monograph on an artist who pioneered the use of the body in art.

Lucian Freud
Two Japanese Wrestlers by a sink. 1983-1987. Oil on canvas. 50,8x78,7
Freud worked on this small still-life painting intermittantly for around five years. Although an unusual work in his oeuvre, its concerns - the representation of passing time, and the relationship of the body and its surroundings - resonate with other works by the artist. The wrestlers’ bodies, seen in a cropped photograph behind the sink, find parallels in the floor tiles and the stained base of the sink, both of which take on a bodily aspect and palette. The dribbling taps, an allegorical symbol for the transience of life, contrast with the stillness and the silence of the studio interrior. - Lucian Freud, Kunsthistorisches Museum Wien. 8 oct. 2013 to 6 jan. 2014 

Lucian Freud

Two Japanese Wrestlers by a sink. 1983-1987. Oil on canvas. 50,8x78,7

Freud worked on this small still-life painting intermittantly for around five years. Although an unusual work in his oeuvre, its concerns - the representation of passing time, and the relationship of the body and its surroundings - resonate with other works by the artist. The wrestlers’ bodies, seen in a cropped photograph behind the sink, find parallels in the floor tiles and the stained base of the sink, both of which take on a bodily aspect and palette. The dribbling taps, an allegorical symbol for the transience of life, contrast with the stillness and the silence of the studio interrior. - Lucian Freud, Kunsthistorisches Museum Wien. 8 oct. 2013 to 6 jan. 2014 

here are several stills extracted from Wallander (2008, season 1, episode 1).

the series was shot in  Skåne  region on the South of Sweden, using RED cameras.

the cinematography is truly extraordinary. each landscape scene – a treasure (the same goes for interior scenes).  

sadly, I couldn’t find any promo pictures or any pictures at all, except for innumerable reblogs of uncountable numbers of Magnus’ close-ups (thanks to Hiddleston fangirls)

so I decided to make some screenshots myself (which, I obviously had no right to do, since I do not own the production) and to share them.

nevertheless enjoy

Wallander. first few seconds

Wallander. first few seconds


ABSTRARCH by Federico Babina
what can I say. I love architecture 

ABSTRARCH by Federico Babina

what can I say. I love architecture 

happy new year

I’m dressed in black, dark green and leather and “I’m burdened with glorious purpose”… all I need now is a helmet with horns or an army (both would be great).

have fun and happy new year!! love! inspire! be inspired! don’t be afraid of anything/anyone/yourself!!

renaissance-art:

Michelangelo c. 1501-1504
David
detail


David in the details…

renaissance-art:

Michelangelo c. 1501-1504

David

detail

David in the details…

(via spiritualize)

space
6. Sufficient freedom from external pressure to develop or explore one’s needs, interests, and individuality
the free dictionary. plenty of food for thought. surprised
Tim Davis, Two Chests from Office / Hospital 
Office / Hospital
I began my career as an artist with a career as an editor. Working at a small, venerable, avant-garde publishing firm, I spent four years sitting in an art-deco office building in Manhattan, reading poetry all day. I had an ideal life; but one I was unsuited for. Once, during a weekly editorial meeting, I noticed the way a fluorescent light fixture reflected the street scene nineteen floors below. It was a moment of liberation. Bored and constrained by the strictures of a nine-to-five life, this little camera lucida on the ceiling radiated freedom. I returned to the office that weekend, pointed my own camera up, and photographed the light fixture. For a year I would go to work at off hours, on weekends and holidays, scouring the small set of seven offices for signs of redemption and clarity. Photography became more than a tool for understanding the world, it was a method of generating meaning. It was a way to survive.

Tim DavisTwo Chests from Office / Hospital 

Office / Hospital

I began my career as an artist with a career as an editor. Working at a small, venerable, avant-garde publishing firm, I spent four years sitting in an art-deco office building in Manhattan, reading poetry all day. I had an ideal life; but one I was unsuited for. Once, during a weekly editorial meeting, I noticed the way a fluorescent light fixture reflected the street scene nineteen floors below. It was a moment of liberation. Bored and constrained by the strictures of a nine-to-five life, this little camera lucida on the ceiling radiated freedom. I returned to the office that weekend, pointed my own camera up, and photographed the light fixture. For a year I would go to work at off hours, on weekends and holidays, scouring the small set of seven offices for signs of redemption and clarity. Photography became more than a tool for understanding the world, it was a method of generating meaning. It was a way to survive.

the camera is an amnesiac constantly, comically and tragically, looking at a new world, and its amnesia is contagious.
MAD cover 
September 1963

MAD cover 

September 1963

Far and away the best prize that life has to offer is the chance to work hard at work worth doing
– Theodore Roosevelt 
I love the cover! and I want this book
The definitive monograph on an artist who pioneered the use of the body in art.

I love the cover! and I want this book

The definitive monograph on an artist who pioneered the use of the body in art.

Lucian Freud
Two Japanese Wrestlers by a sink. 1983-1987. Oil on canvas. 50,8x78,7
Freud worked on this small still-life painting intermittantly for around five years. Although an unusual work in his oeuvre, its concerns - the representation of passing time, and the relationship of the body and its surroundings - resonate with other works by the artist. The wrestlers’ bodies, seen in a cropped photograph behind the sink, find parallels in the floor tiles and the stained base of the sink, both of which take on a bodily aspect and palette. The dribbling taps, an allegorical symbol for the transience of life, contrast with the stillness and the silence of the studio interrior. - Lucian Freud, Kunsthistorisches Museum Wien. 8 oct. 2013 to 6 jan. 2014 

Lucian Freud

Two Japanese Wrestlers by a sink. 1983-1987. Oil on canvas. 50,8x78,7

Freud worked on this small still-life painting intermittantly for around five years. Although an unusual work in his oeuvre, its concerns - the representation of passing time, and the relationship of the body and its surroundings - resonate with other works by the artist. The wrestlers’ bodies, seen in a cropped photograph behind the sink, find parallels in the floor tiles and the stained base of the sink, both of which take on a bodily aspect and palette. The dribbling taps, an allegorical symbol for the transience of life, contrast with the stillness and the silence of the studio interrior. - Lucian Freud, Kunsthistorisches Museum Wien. 8 oct. 2013 to 6 jan. 2014 

happy new year
"space
6. Sufficient freedom from external pressure to develop or explore one’s needs, interests, and individuality"
"the camera is an amnesiac constantly, comically and tragically, looking at a new world, and its amnesia is contagious."
"Far and away the best prize that life has to offer is the chance to work hard at work worth doing"

About:

mad dancer. space invader. art lover

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